Ontario universities are improving efficiency by finding new ways of doing business and forming innovative partnerships. Universities continue to cut costs through collaboration, shared services, and ...

Improving Efficiency at Ontario Universities

Published: December 3, 2015

Ontario universities are improving efficiency by finding new ways of doing business and forming innovative partnerships. Universities continue to cut costs through collaboration, shared services, and administrative efficiencies, while improving services for students and staff. The Ontario government’s Productivity and Innovation Fund (PIF) – a $45 million investment in Ontario’s postsecondary sector – was a major catalyst for collaboration that has achieved amazing results. The report features several PIF projects and also highlights what individual universities are doing to leverage technology, modernize administrative processes and make their facilities and operations run smarter, not harder.

Faster, Cheaper, Smarter: Improving Efficiency at Ontario Universities is a follow-up report to the 2011 Innovative Ideas report.

“Our government understands that we need to support innovative and collaborative change to strengthen our world-class postsecondary education system. I am thrilled to see that the Productivity and Innovation Fund is helping spur transformational change at our universities as they modernize their systems and processes to improve the learning experience for students.” — Reza Moridi Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities

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